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Delta Air Lines

From Academic Kids

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Delta Air Lines Logo


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Delta Air Lines 767-400ER.

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Delta Boeing 757-232 at LAX in August 2003.

Delta Air Lines Template:Nyse Template:Airline codes is a major U.S. airline headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, operating a large domestic and international network that spans North America, South America, Europe, and Asia.

Delta operates hubs at Atlanta, Cincinnati, and Salt Lake City. Delta also has large operations in many other cities, including Boston, Los Angeles, New York, Orlando, and Washington, D.C. Its major international gateways are Atlanta, Cincinnati, and (most recently) New York-JFK.

In terms of passengers carried (87 million in 2004), Delta is the second-largest airline in the world (behind American Airlines). In terms of total operating revenues, Delta is the fourth-largest airline in the world (behind Air France-KLM, American Airlines, and United Airlines) As of March 1, 2005, Delta and its subsidiaries served 219 destinations in 46 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as 53 international destinations in 35 countries. Delta has a marketing alliance with both Continental Airlines and Northwest Airlines and is a founding member of, and the second largest carrier in, the SkyTeam international alliance.

Contents

Business structure

Delta Air Lines, Inc., is incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware. As of January, 2004, Gerald Grinstein is the Chief Executive Officer.

Delta operates several airline brands. The "mainline" Delta brand serves primarily long-haul, high-volume flights and most international services. Short-haul, high frequency service between Boston, New York, and Washington, D.C., are operated in a single-class configuration under the Delta Shuttle brand. The Delta brand Song began single-class, "no-frills" service on some of its leisure dominated routes on April 15, 2003.

Separate regional airlines operate feeder flights, under code share agreements, primarily to Delta hub cities under the Delta Connection banner. These airlines include wholly-owned subsidiaries Comair, and Atlantic Southeast Airlines, as well as independent carriers Chautauqua Airlines, SkyWest, and American Eagle.

Of all major U.S. airlines, Delta is the least unionized. At December 31, 2003, Delta had a total of approximately 70,600 full-time equivalent employees, of which only approximately 18% were represented by unions.

Delta awards the annual Delta Prize for Global Understanding in conjunction with the University of Georgia.

History

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Delta Boeing 747 at London (Heathrow) Airport, operated by Pan Am, in May 1974.

The company has its roots in Huff Daland Dusters, which was founded in 1924 in Macon, Georgia but moved to Monroe, Louisiana the following year. In 1928, Huff Daland Dusters was purchased and renamed 'Delta Air Services', where its route connected Dallas, Texas to Jackson, Mississippi, via Shreveport, Louisiana and Monroe. In 1941, Delta moved its headquarters from Monroe to Atlanta, Georgia, to center itself along its new route network that connected Chicago and New Orleans to Florida.

In the 1950s, Delta began flights from New Orleans to the Caribbean and Venezuela, becoming the number 2 U.S. carrier in the region after Pan Am and Braniff. By the early 1960s, Delta's route network stretched to the West Coast, and Dallas was emerging as its second hub city. Delta was the launch operator of both the DC-8 and DC-9 jets.

Delta purchased Northeast Airlines in 1972 to strengthen its market share in the northeastern United States. In 1978, Delta began flying from Atlanta to London with new Lockheed L-1011 TriStar aircraft: Frankfurt was added the following year.

Delta was named official airline to Walt Disney World in 1985. Their official ride in the Magic Kingdom was Delta Dreamflight. In 1987, Delta took over Western Airlines and absorbed its large hubs at Salt Lake City and Los Angeles. That year, Delta began flights from Portland, Oregon to Tokyo, Seoul, and Bangkok, its first transpacific routes.

Delta was the first airline to operate the MD-11 aircraft in 1990. Delta's most dramatic expansion came with its purchase of Pan American's European routes in 1991, shortly before Pan Am declared bankruptcy. The purchase gave Delta the largest transatlantic route network through most of the 1990s and a small group of A310 aircraft that were retired after a few years.

Delta was one of the airlines targeted in the failed Operation Bojinka plot: the conspirators planned to bomb a Delta MD-11 flying from Seoul to Bangkok via Taipei on January 21, 1995.

Delta was a founding partner of the online travel agency Orbitz, which was purchased by Cendant in 2004.

Current restructuring

Delta operated its last MD-11 flight on January 1, 2004, Flight 56 departing New Tokyo International Airport (now Narita International Airport) at 4:45pm. The aircraft arrived in Atlanta at 3:20pm. This concluded MD-11 service in the fleet (being replaced by the Boeing 777-200), with Delta having retired the other three-engined aircraft, the Boeing 727 (replaced by the Boeing 737-800) in 2003, and the Lockheed L-1011 (replaced by the Boeing 767-400) in 2001. Its entire active fleet is now comprised of twinjets. Delta had 14 MD-11's at the time of the aircraft's retirement. On September 23, 2004, a Delta spokesperson confirmed plans to sell eight MD-11s to FedEx.

As part of Delta's transformation plan, they are planning to retire four aircraft types. According to a report by Aviation Daily (http://www.aviationnow.com/avnow/news/channel_aviationdaily_story.jsp?id=news/del09154.xml), Delta is planning to retire their 737-200, 737-300, 767-200, and MD-90 fleet. A more recent report by Dow Jones Newswires (article at iWon Money (http://money.iwon.com/jsp/nw/nwdt_rt.jsp?section=news&news_id=dji-00078120050217&feed=dji&date=20050217&cat=INDUSTRY)) states that Delta's CFO Michael Palumbo aims to drop the 737-200, 737-300, and 767-200. The fourth type is currently undecided, being either the MD-80 or MD-90. Replacement aircraft are currently unknown, although it is expected that the MD-80 or MD-90 will be replaced by a 737 family aircraft, probably the 737-800.

In 2004, in an effort to avoid bankruptcy, Delta announced a restructuring of the company that included job cuts as well as turnaround plans for expansion of Atlanta operations by some 100 new flights making it a 'super-hub' and requiring the airline to spread its flight schedule more evenly across the day. On January 5, 2005, the company revamped its fare structure, cutting its most expensive fares by as much as 50 percent nationwide and capping one-way domestic fares at $499 in coach class and $599 first class. Delta closed its hub at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport on January 31.

In 2005, Delta applied to serve a daily non-stop flight from Atlanta to Beijing, China starting in March 2006, but slots were given to Continental Airlines.

Disasters

On the morning of August 2, 1985, Delta Air Lines Flight 191, on a Fort Lauderdale-Dallas/Fort Worth-Los Angeles route, crashed at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, killing 133 of the 164 passengers on board. The crash would later become the subject of a television movie.

On August 31, 1988, Delta Air Lines Flight 1411, bound from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport to Salt Lake City International Airport, crashed after take-off.

Delta Air Lines Fleet

Delta operates an all-Boeing (including McDonnell Douglas aircaft) fleet. They do not operate any Airbus aircaft, nor do they have any on order.

Delta has abolished three-class seating, replacing both first and business class on intercontinental flights with a single premium class called "BusinessElite."

Delta Air Lines Fleet (excluding Delta Connection)
Type Number Orders Options Rolling Options Total # of seats Cargo capacity Engine Model Audio/Video
Boeing 737-232 52 0 0 0 100 850 ft (24 m) Pratt & Whitney JT8D-15A No
Boeing 737-332 26 0 0 0 128 850 ft (24 m) CFM International CFM56-3B1 No
McDonnell Douglas / Boeing MD-88 120 0 0 0 142 1,253 ft (35.5 m) Pratt & Whitney JT8D-219 No
McDonnell Douglas / Boeing MD-90 16 0 0 0 150 1,300 ft (36.8 m) International Aero V2525-D5 Yes
Boeing 737-832 71 61 60 168 150 1,555 ft (44.0 m) CFM International CFM56-7B26 Yes
Boeing 757-232 121 0 0 0 183 1,670 ft (47.3 m) Pratt & Whitney PW2037 Yes
Boeing 767-232 15 0 0 0 204 2,875 ft (81.4 m) GE CF6-80A Yes
Boeing 767-332 28 0 0 0 252 3,770 ft (107 m) GE CF6-80A2 Yes
Boeing 767-332ER 59 0 10 6 204 3,770 ft (107 m) GE CF6-80C2B6F / Pratt & Whitney PW4060 Yes
Boeing 767-432ER 21 0 22 0 285 4,580 ft (130 m) GE CF6-80C2B7F Yes
Boeing 777-232 8 5 20 5 268 5,656 ft (160 m) Rolls-Royce Trent 892 Yes
Retired Jet Fleet
Type Year Retired Replacement Engine Model Audio/Video
Douglas DC-8  ??? Boeing 757-232  ???  ???
Convair CV-880  ???  ???  ???  ???
Douglas DC-9-10  ???  ??? Pratt & Whitney JT8D-5 No
Douglas DC-9-30  ??? McDonnell Douglas / Boeing MD-80 Pratt & Whitney JT8D series No
Boeing 747-132  ??? None  ???  ???
Airbus A310 1990s None  ???  ???
Lockheed L-1011 2001 Boeing 767-432ER Rolls-Royce RB211 series Yes
Boeing 727-232 2002 Boeing 737-832 and, partially, Boeing 757-232 Pratt & Whitney JT8D series No
McDonnell Douglas / Boeing MD-11 2003 Boeing 777-232 Pratt & Whitney PW4460 Yes

Destinations

See full article: Delta Air Lines destinations


Members of the Skyteam Alliance
Aeromxico | Air France | Alitalia | Continental Airlines | CSA Czech Airlines | Delta Air Lines | KLM | Korean Air | Northwest Airlines
Future Members: Air Europa | Aeroflot | China Southern Airlines | COPA | Kenya Airways | TAROM
List of Aircraft | Aircraft Manufacturers | Aircraft Engines | Aircraft Engine Manufacturers
Airlines | Air Forces | Aircraft Weapons | Missiles | Timeline of aviation

External links

es:Delta Air Lines fr:Delta Air Lines ja:デルタ航空

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