Advertisement

Wenatchee, Washington

From Academic Kids

The Sellar Bridge spans the Columbia connecting Wenatchee and East Wenatchee.
The Sellar Bridge spans the Columbia connecting Wenatchee and East Wenatchee.

Wenatchee is a city located in Chelan County, Washington. Wenatchee is nestled in the eastern foothills of the picturesque Cascade Mountains. Wenatchee is known as the "Apple Capital of the World" for the valley's many orchards, which produce apples enjoyed around the world. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 27,856. It is the county seat of Chelan CountyTemplate:GR.

Contents

History

Archeological digs have uncovered Clovis artifacts and other ancient artifacts dating back almost 12,000 years that enlightened us to the fact that people migrating during the last ice age settled in Wenatchee. Some believe that the people who remained became the Yakama Indians. The Yakima inhabited this area for ten millennia. The Columbia provided an ample supply of food. They took refuge from the flooding river on the plateau or in high up caves in the coulee walls. In the late 1800s, the white settlers came and began homesteading the land. Wenatchee was officially incorporated as a city on January 7, 1893.

On October 5, 1931, Clyde Pangborn with co-pilot Hugh Herndon landed his plane, the Miss Veedol, in the hills of East Wenatchee and became the first person to fly non-stop across the Pacific Ocean. The 41 hour flight from Sabishiro Beach, Misawa, Aomori Prefecture, Japan won him the Harmon Trophy symbolizing the greatest achievement in flight for the year 1931.

In 1936, with the completion of Rock Island Dam, Wenatchee was protected from the summer flooding of the Columbia River as well as having a nice reservoir from which to irrigate crops. Orchards were planted closer to the river and in no time Wenatchee became the apple capital of the world.

Wenatchee made international headlines in 1994 and 1995 when police and state social workers undertook what was then called the nation's most extensive child sex-abuse investigation. 43 adults were arrested on 29,726 charges of child sex abuse involving 60 children. Parents, Sundayschool teachers and a pastor were charged and many were convicted of abusing their own children or the children of other in the community. A massive conspiracy arose which the press deemed the "Wenatchee Sex Rings". Courts ultimately determined the charges were entirely untrue. Police coerced children into giving false statements, and false testimony in court. Dr. Phillip Esplin, a forensic psychologist for the National Institutes of Health's Child Witness Project commented that "Wenatchee may be the worst example ever of mental health services being abused by a state...to control and manage children who have been frightened and coerced into falsely accusing their parents and neighbors of the most heinous of crimes."

Wenatchee also has the reputation for being the Prozac capital of the world. In June of 1995, PBS aired a documentary about this called Welcome to Happy Valley, which chronicled Dr. Jim Goodwin a psychologist, proclaimed by the New York Times as the "Pied Piper of Prozac" and the CBS "Eye to Eye" program as the "Pied Piper of Depression." Dr Goodwin also utilizes short-term cognitive psychotherapy recognized as essential along with such medications.

Every year around the end of April, Wenatchee has its Apple Blossom Festival, which probably brings in the largest number of people Wenatchee sees annually. It features 2 relatively large parades, a food fair, and a few carnival rides. In past years, cruising Wenatchee Avenue at night has become enough of a problem that local government has taken numerous steps to try and end it.

Geography

Location of Wenatchee, Washington
Wenatchee is located at 47°25'24" North, 120°19'31" West (47.423316, -120.325279)Template:GR at the at the confluence of the Wenatchee River and the Columbia River in the Columbia Basin just east of the foothills of the Cascade Range. Unlike the climate of Western Washington, Wenatchee's climate is arid. Nested in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains, there are blue skies 300 days of the year. Technically a desert, irrigation from the Columbia River and her tributaries allows for the large amount of agriculture in Wenatchee and the surrounding areas.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 19.0 km² (7.3 mi²). 17.8 km² (6.9 mi²) of it is land and 1.2 km² (0.4 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 6.14% water.

Demographics

As of the censusTemplate:GR of 2000, there are 27,856 people, 10,741 households, and 6,884 families residing in the city. The population density is 1,563.3/km² (4,049.6/mi²). There are 11,486 housing units at an average density of 644.6/km² (1,669.8/mi²). The racial makeup of the city is 80.93% White, 0.39% African American, 1.13% Native American, 0.95% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 13.99% from other races, and 2.48% from two or more races. 21.52% of the population are Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There are 10,741 households out of which 33.4% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.4% are married couples living together, 10.2% have a female householder with no husband present, and 35.9% are non-families. 30.1% of all households are made up of individuals and 13.4% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.53 and the average family size is 3.17.

In the city the population is spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 10.0% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 19.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age is 34 years. For every 100 females there are 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 92.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city is $34,897, and the median income for a family is $45,982. Males have a median income of $35,245 versus $26,062 for females. The per capita income for the city is $19,498. 15.3% of the population and 10.6% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 19.7% of those under the age of 18 and 5.7% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line.

External links

  • The Wenatchee World (http://www.wenworld.com/), daily newspaper.
  • El Mundo (http://www.elmundocom.net/), Spanish-language weekly newspaper for Washington State, based in Wenatchee.

Template:Mapit-US-cityscale

Missing image
Washington_state_flag.png
Flag of Washington

State of Washington
Cities | Towns | Municipalities | Governors | Legislature | Initiatives | Congress | Symbols | Parks | Roads | Music

State capital:

Olympia

Regions:

Central Washington | Columbia River Plateau | Eastern Washington | Inland Empire | Kitsap Peninsula | Olympic Peninsula | Okanogan Country | Palouse | Puget Sound | San Juan Islands | Western Washington | Yakima Valley

Major cities:

Bellevue | Everett | Federal Way | Kent | Seattle | Spokane | Tacoma | Vancouver | Yakima

Smaller cities:

Auburn | Bellingham | Bremerton | Edmonds | Kennewick | Kirkland | Lakewood | Olympia | Pasco | Redmond | Renton | Richland | Shoreline

Counties:

Adams | Asotin | Benton | Chelan | Clallam | Clark | Columbia | Cowlitz | Douglas | Ferry | Franklin | Garfield | Grant | Grays Harbor | Island | Jefferson | King | Kitsap | Kittitas | Klickitat | Lewis | Lincoln | Mason | Okanogan | Pacific | Pend Oreille | Pierce | San Juan | Skagit | Skamania | Snohomish | Spokane | Stevens | Thurston | Wahkiakum | Walla Walla | Whatcom | Whitman | Yakima

Navigation

Academic Kids Menu

  • Art and Cultures
    • Art (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Art)
    • Architecture (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Architecture)
    • Cultures (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Cultures)
    • Music (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Music)
    • Musical Instruments (http://academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/List_of_musical_instruments)
  • Biographies (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Biographies)
  • Clipart (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Clipart)
  • Geography (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Geography)
    • Countries of the World (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Countries)
    • Maps (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Maps)
    • Flags (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Flags)
    • Continents (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Continents)
  • History (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/History)
    • Ancient Civilizations (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Ancient_Civilizations)
    • Industrial Revolution (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Industrial_Revolution)
    • Middle Ages (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Middle_Ages)
    • Prehistory (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Prehistory)
    • Renaissance (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Renaissance)
    • Timelines (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Timelines)
    • United States (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/United_States)
    • Wars (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Wars)
    • World History (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/History_of_the_world)
  • Human Body (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Human_Body)
  • Mathematics (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Mathematics)
  • Reference (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Reference)
  • Science (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Science)
    • Animals (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Animals)
    • Aviation (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Aviation)
    • Dinosaurs (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Dinosaurs)
    • Earth (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Earth)
    • Inventions (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Inventions)
    • Physical Science (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Physical_Science)
    • Plants (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Plants)
    • Scientists (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Scientists)
  • Social Studies (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Social_Studies)
    • Anthropology (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Anthropology)
    • Economics (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Economics)
    • Government (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Government)
    • Religion (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Religion)
    • Holidays (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Holidays)
  • Space and Astronomy
    • Solar System (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Solar_System)
    • Planets (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Planets)
  • Sports (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Sports)
  • Timelines (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Timelines)
  • Weather (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Weather)
  • US States (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/US_States)

Information

  • Home Page (http://academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php)
  • Contact Us (http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Contactus)

  • Clip Art (http://classroomclipart.com)
Toolbox
Personal tools