Canada Post

From Academic Kids

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Canada Post or Canada Post Corporation (CPC) is the Canadian government's postal service. The successor to the Post Office Department of the Government of Canada, this crown corporation was created on October 16, 1981 by the Canada Post Corporation Act to set a new direction for the postal service, creating more reliable service and ensuring the postal services financial security and independence.

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Canada Post Place in Ottawa

In 2003 Canada Post handled 10.3 billion mail items. It employed over 60,000 people in its traditional mail operations and an additional 12,500 at the 94% owned Purolator Courier parcel delivery subsidiary.

Canada Post delivers to 13 million addresses daily, Monday to Friday, using a combination of traditional "to the door" door delivery, by 15,000 letter carriers, supplemented by approximately 6,000 vehicle routes in rural and suburban areas, and truck delivery of parcels in urban areas. A more recent electronic delivery method for routine bills and statements was introduced in 1999, named e-Post. In terms of area serviced, Canada Post delivers to a larger area than the postal service of any other nation, including Russia (where service in Siberia is limited largely to communities along the railroad).

There are 280,000 retail points of deposit for mail, a combination of CPC staffed locations and franchises which are operated by a private retailer in conjunction with a host retail business.

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A Canada Post delivery truck
Overall revenues for CPC in 2003 were CAD 6.34 billion (USD 5.07B), of which the traditional mail business made up 81%, Purolator 17% and electronic and consulting activities generated 2%. Income before taxes was CAD 154 million (USD 123 million).

Canada Post Systems Management Limited, CPSML, was founded by the CPC in 1990 to market the company's systems and technology in the global marketplace. As of the end of 2000, there were 80 successful projects in 38 countries.

Canada Post (French: Postes Canada) is the Federal Identity Program name. The legal name is Canada Post Corporation in English and Société canadienne des Postes in French.

Contents

Labour troubles

Canada Post has a history of troubled labour relations with its trade unions, particularly the Canadian Union of Postal Workers and the Letter Carrier's Union of Canada (which merged with CUPW in 1989) culminating in periodic strike action which has brought mail service in Canada to a halt. There have been at least 19 strikes and walkouts between 1965 and 2005 including several wildcat strikes. A number of these strikes have seen the corporation employ strike breakers and most, since the 1970s, have resulted in back-to-work legislation being passed by the Canadian parliament.

Canada Post was also the setting for one of the most controversial labour rulings of recent years. After several prosecutions for theft at Missisauga's Gateway Postal Plant, the union won a ruling from a labour board that the workers involved could not be dismissed as the length of the investigation exceeded the ten-day limit in the collective agreement under which any allegation of misconduct had to be brought to the attention of the worker. Although the ruling was reversed on appeal, the Ontario Court of Appeal ruled that although the decision may have been incorrect, it was not so totally without merit that the labour board's decision should be overturned. The court noted the language was in the collective agreement to keep supervisors from holding infractions over the head of a worker indefinitely.

Addressing envelopes

Any letter sent within Canada has the destination address on the centre of its envelope, with a stamp, postal indicia, meter label, or frank mark put on the top-right corner of the envelope to acknowledge payment of postage. A return address, although it is not required, can be put on the top-left corner of the envelope in smaller type than the destination address. The price of postage for a standard-size domestic letter, as of January 17, 2005 is 50¢, which, according to Canada Post, is among the lowest basic postage rates in the developed world.

Official addressing protocol is for the address to be typed in block capitals, using a fixed-pitch typeface (such as Courier). The first line(s) of the address are for the personal name and internal address of the recipient. The second-to-last line is the post office box, general delivery indicator, or street address, using the shortened name of the street type and no punctuation. The last line consists of the city name, a single space, the two-letter province abbreviation, two full spaces, and then the postal code.

Examples:

JOHN JONES
MARKETING DEPT
10-123 1/2 MAIN ST NW
MONTRÉAL QC  H3Z 2Y7
 
JOHN JONES
1425 JAMES ST
PO BOX 4001 STN A
VICTORIA BC  V8X 3X4
JOHN JONES
2765 7TH CONCESSION
SITE 6 COMP 10
RR 8 STN MAIN
MILLARVILLE AB  T0L 1K0
JOHN JONES
GD STN MAIN
WALKERTON ON  N0G 2V0

Services offered by Canada Post

  • Lettermail
  • Incentive Lettermail
  • Addressed Admail
  • Unaddressed Admail
  • Catalogue Mail
  • Publications Mail
  • Business Reply Mail
  • Regular Parcel
  • XpressPost
  • Priority Courier
  • Purolator Courier

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